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Keynote Lectures

Personalising and Scaling Mental Health Care and Mental Health Research by Digital Means
Harald Baumeister, Ulm University, Germany

How to Make User Interfaces More Accessible and Easier to Use for People Who Are Different from Us — Breaking the Spell of the Curse of Knowledge
Harold Thimbleby, Swansea University, United Kingdom

Available Soon
Laura Fiorini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy

 

Personalising and Scaling Mental Health Care and Mental Health Research by Digital Means

Harald Baumeister
Ulm University
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Prof. Baumeister is head of the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy and the associated psychotherapeutic university outpatient clinic at Ulm University. His research concept represents a multi-methods, interdisciplinary approach on mental and behavioural health across the lifespan. The topic results in a focus that ranges from public mental health, prevention, and health promotion, psychological and psychotherapeutic treatment to rehabilitation and aftercare concepts. His main areas of expertise are research on digital mental and behavioural health, depression and anxiety, digital phenotyping, smart sensing and psychodiagnostics, psychotherapy as well as health services research (https://www.uni-ulm.de/in/psy-klips/forschung/forschung/).
He has published more than 300 articles and book chapters and is internationally renowned as expert in the field of digital mental and behavioural health research. Two recent books focus on digital health interventions as well as digital phenotyping and mobile sensing. He is speaker of several interest groups on digital health and part of the two newly to be founded German Centres of Mental Health and Child and Adolescent Health.


Abstract
Digital mental health is a broad term that refers to both diagnostic and interventional solutions for healthcare as well as innovative digital research approaches in the field of mental health research. These applications include, for example, digital routine outcome monitoring systems and digital decision support systems, internet and mobile-based interventions, chatbots and just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAI) as well as ecological momentary assessment (EMA), smart sensing and digital phenotyping. After decades of research focusing on the feasibility, acceptability, efficacy and effectiveness of digital solutions, the field is now turning to more challenging questions such as the personalisation and scaling of mental health care and research. Knowledge about moderators, active components and mechanisms of change of effective digital applications for mental health will open up new opportunities for personalised mental health care. Efficient digital research infrastructures integrated into routine care will enable research to be accelerated at scale, providing the basis for artificial intelligence (AI)-based digital solutions. This presentation will discuss research findings, opportunities and challenges on the path to personalising and scaling mental health care.



 

 

How to Make User Interfaces More Accessible and Easier to Use for People Who Are Different from Us — Breaking the Spell of the Curse of Knowledge

Harold Thimbleby
Swansea University
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Prof Harold Thimbleby has been working on user interface design since the 1980s. He has given over 600 presentations and workshops around the world, and has become a well-known speaker. In 2000, one of his students was hit by a car, and he discovered digital healthcare had serious problems. Harold has been working in digital healthcare ever since; he has written a prize-winning book Fix IT: See and Solve the Problems of Digital Healthcare (OUP 2021) and written a powerful booklet with his wife Prue: Patient Safety: Stories for a Digital World (https://www.harold.thimbleby.net/booklet). Despite being a computer scientist, Harold has been elected to honorary fellowships of the Royal College of Physicians and the Edinburgh Royal College of Physicians; he is also a fellow of the Learned Society of Wales, and the Royal Society of Arts. Harold is married and has four amazing children.


Abstract
When we are young most things are reasonably easy to use and we rarely think much about them — we just get on and do things. As we get older, though, what used to be simple things become harder and harder. Since people who are successful designers tend to be younger (and certainly not so old that things are getting difficult to use!), they may unintentionally make things harder for older people. They also unintentionally make things harder for busy people, such as nurses, firefighters and others with demanding jobs that leave less cognitive resources for dealing with poor design. This article gives some examples, and makes suggestions so we can recognize, avoid and fix or mitigate the problems.



 

 

Keynote Lecture

Laura Fiorini
Università degli Studi di Firenze
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Available Soon


Abstract
Available Soon



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